Review – Captain America: Civil War

Hands up who thought the clean-cut, living, breathing symbol of freedom and liberty would have ended up showing the rest of the Marvel Cinematic Universe how it’s done?

Forever a man out of his time, Steve Rogers’ guiding principles have seen the first Avenger become a square peg in a round hole that has resulted in him falling out of favour with the powers that be.

Captain America: Civil War harvests the seeds of doubt that were planted in The Winter Soldier and closes a chapter on the MCU that has led to the ultimate emblem of apple pie-eating pride transform from, in the words of directors Anthony and Joe Russo, “patriot to insurgent”.

So long as the calibre of films remains as high as Captain America: Civil War, then we'll continue to hold out hope

So long as the calibre of films remains as high as Captain America: Civil War, then we’ll continue to hold out hope

It’s been a fascinating journey, one that is arguably the defining aspect of Marvel’s epic big screen enterprise and the Cap trilogy has stood head and shoulders above the rest thanks to a compelling mixture of great storytelling, engaging characters and standout direction.

Chris Evans’ central performance should also not be underestimated and he gives his best turn yet in Civil War. Evans has the square-jawed all-American looks befitting the part, but there’s also steel behind the eyes that gets sorely tested this time out.

Civil War picks up after the events of Avengers: Age Of Ultron, with a tragedy during an Avengers mission being the metaphorical straw that breaks the camel’s back for the authorities. U.S Secretary of State Thaddeus Ross (William Hurt) announces that, despite the debt owed by society, no longer can collateral damage by tolerated.

Black Panther (Chadwick Boseman) gets stuck in alongside his allies in Captain America: Civil War

Black Panther (Chadwick Boseman) gets stuck in alongside his allies in Captain America: Civil War

The Sokovia Accords (so named after the country affected by the events of Age Of Ultron) are drawn up and the Avengers are urged to sign and agree to fall under the jurisdiction of the United Nations. Wracked with guilt for his part in creating Ultron, Tony Stark/Iron Man (Robert Downey, Jr.) leads the call to sign up and while some fall into line others, most notably Cap, are less inclined.

When a terrorist act seemingly points the finger at Cap’s old buddy Bucky Barnes, aka the Winter Solider (Sebastian Stan), the fissure between the Avengers and, in particular, Iron Man and Captain America grows bigger and more strained. But was Bucky responsible or is another force at work?

Black Panther (Chadwick Boseman) gets stuck in alongside his allies in Captain America: Civil War

Black Panther (Chadwick Boseman) gets stuck in alongside his allies in Captain America: Civil War

On paper, Civil War treads a similar path to Batman vs Superman: Dawn Of Justice – superheroes end up at each other’s throats when they should be on the same side. However, the difference in execution is glaring, with Zack Snyder’s effort little more than a one-dimensional bludgeoning in comparison to Marvel’s latest.

Another difference between both films is how it brings new characters into the fold. Whilst Batman vs Superman crowbarred in the likes of Aquaman via a flimsy laptop session, this introduces a young, inexperienced Spider-Man (Tom Holland) and a hard-as-nails Black Panther (Chadwick Boseman) in organic and believable ways. The scenes Downey, Jr shares with Holland are especially fun and promise much for Spidey’s official Marvel debut.

Indeed, fun is something that can be found in plentiful supply here (another advantage over Bats vs Supes) and the balance between light and dark is nicely handled.

Spider-Man (Tom Holland) joins the party in Captain America: Civil War

Spider-Man (Tom Holland) joins the party in Captain America: Civil War

Importantly, both sides of the argument are given equal weight. It’s difficult to disagree with the weight of evidence brought to the table by Ross, while Stark’s point that it’s better to sign now rather than having more draconian accords thrust upon them later on is persuasive. However, the counterpoint put forward by Rogers that becoming the tool of political forces means you will forever be in its sway is equally valid. After all, following the events of The Winter Soldier, it’s not surprising Rogers has his doubts about the fortitude of institutions.

The charge that Civil War gets too bogged down with its characters is understandable – as is the assertion that this is basically Avengers 3 rather than Cap 3. That does a disservice, though, to Christopher Markus and Stephen McFeely’s script and the Russo’s direction, which tries not to leave anyone behind.

The plethora of A and B-list Avengers ultimately pays off in the central airport hanger sequence, which starts off lightly as both sides weigh in to each other whilst saying “we’re still friends right?” before the punches start to land with more purpose. It’s a great action scene that again mixes dramatic stakes alongside lighter moments, not least of which involving Ant-Man (Paul Rudd) who literally gets the biggest moment.

Who needs friends? Iron Man (Robert Downey Jr) goes up against Cap (Chris Evans) and Bucky Barnes (Sebastian Stan) in Captain America: Civil War

Who needs friends? Iron Man (Robert Downey Jr) goes up against Cap (Chris Evans) and Bucky Barnes (Sebastian Stan) in Captain America: Civil War

Perhaps in response to the criticism levelled at Marvel movies that their final acts often descend into epic CGI-heavy carnage, Civil War‘s denouement is far more effective for being much smaller and personal in scale as well as bleaker in tone. The motives behind Daniel Bruhl’s pitch perfect villain Helmut Zemo become clear as the endgame draws near and speaks to the overall tone of the film – of actions having consequences down the line and the fragility of alliances when trust is in short supply.

Quite how much longer the MCU can keep juggling so many balls is up for debate, but so long as the calibre of films remains as high as Captain America: Civil War, then we’ll continue to hold out hope.

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8 comments

  1. Wendell · May 28, 2016

    Excellent review. And I totally agree this gets much better results than Batman v Superman out of similar material.

  2. Dan O. · May 28, 2016

    Nice review. It’s got a lot going on, but it handles it all so perfectly.

  3. ruth · May 30, 2016

    I love your opening line Mark!! You’re right, who knew this goody two shoes, ‘man out of his time’ as you said ends up being one of the best Marvel superhero franchise, if not THE best so far. It’s hands down my fave trilogy of MCU phase 1, I LOVE all three Captain America movies from the start and this one capped the trilogy in a marvelous way (pardon the puns!) Great review!

  4. Jordan Dodd · May 30, 2016

    Great review mate. I wish I could have gotten into this, but I’m reading more and more interesting points about it. I might watch it again on the small screen

  5. Stu · May 31, 2016

    Pretty much in agreement with you here, Mark. I enjoyed it a lot at the time, although I’ve barely thought about it since, which I guess is part of the pleasure. I thought they did OK in terms of juggling all the characters, while keeping the focus on half a dozen of them, and I’m looking forward to the Spider-Man and Black Panther films as a result.

  6. Zoë · June 1, 2016

    Glad to see you enjoyed this so much! I liked this, but definitely didn’t love it like I did the last two installments.

  7. Tom · June 5, 2016

    Wonderful review. This does seem to represent a peak in the MCU 8 years in the making doesn’t it? I couldn’t believe how much fun I had throughout this. And I think my simultaneous enjoyment while I felt guilt for the burdens Cap and Iron man carries here is a testament to this particular m3ga-blockbuster superhero script. This things the real deal boys and girls

  8. MovieManJackson · June 8, 2016

    After Cap America: The First Avenger, I never would have thought Cap would turn out to be the MCU’s best character with the best films. Yeah, you can go with Stark and the Iron Man’s, but this trilogy of Cap’s blows Iron Man’s out of the water. And though we get more depth with Stark’s character this go-around, I still feel that Steve is the most compelling.

    Seen twice, may buy on Blu-Ray. Great write up.

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