‘Decades’ Blogathon – The Final List!

Decades Blogathon Banner

That’s it! The final spots have been filled and we now have the roll call of the 20 entries for the ‘Decades’ blogathon being hosted by myself and Tom over at Digital Shortbread!

As you can see from the list below, there’s a wide range of entries covering all genres that – I’m delighted to say – go back 100 years. Personally speaking, that’s exactly what I wanted to see when I first thought about doing this blogathon and I’m really looking forward to getting this underway.

Thanks so much to everyone for their interest and sorry to anyone who has missed out on this occasion. There’s always next year when we can possibly run this again and feature movies released in the sixth year of the decade – there are plenty I’d like to see on that list!

So here’s the full list:

1. Movies SilentlyThe Taking Of Luke McVane (1915)
2. Back To The ViewerA Night At The Opera (1935)
3. Defiant SuccessMildred Pierce (1945)
4. Epileptic MoondancerNight Of The Hunter (1955)
5. Tranquil DreamsLady And The Tramp (1955)
6. Movie RobMonty Python And The Holy Grail (1975)
7. It Rains… You Get WetShampoo (1975)
8. Fast Film ReviewsOne Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest (1975)
9. Carly Hearts MoviesTommy (1975)
10. Cindy BruchmanBarry Lyndon (1975)
11. Film GrimoireDeep Red (1975)
12. Movie Man JacksonThe Stepford Wives (1975)
13. The IPCJaws (1975)
14. Three Rows Back – Back To The Future (1985)
15. The Cinematic FrontierPee Wee’s Big Adventure (1985)
16. Kaput, AlreadyThe Purple Rose Of Cairo (1985)
17. Ramblings of a CinephileLa Haine (1995)
18. Drew’s Movie ReviewsTommy Boy (1995)
19. Committed to CelluloidCasino (1995)
20. Digital ShortbreadBatman Begins (2005)

Now that we have our list, we’ll be aiming to start the blogathon on Monday, 18 May and will post one review each on our sites (10 on this site and 10 on Digital Shortbread). We’ll make sure to flag up each other’s daily posts to ensure every review on the list gets plenty of exposure.

Thanks again to everyone who’s taking part in what’s sure to be a great blogathon. See you on the 18th!

‘Decades’ Blogathon – Get In Quick!

Decades Blogathon Banner

Spots have been filling up fast for a new blogathon being hosted by myself and Tom from Digital Shortbread… but there’s still time to get involved before they all go!

The response to our call for contributors to the ‘Decades’ blogathon has been fanastic and it’s already promising to be a great event. We have a couple of spots left so be quick!

The blogathon focuses on movies that were released in the fifth year of the decade – whether that be 1985, 1935, 1945 or any other decade.

So far, the following discerning writers have confirmed that they will be joining Tom and I in this endeavour:

The Cinematic FrontierPee Wee’s Big Adventure (1985)
Ramblings of a CinephileLa Haine (1995)
Drew’s Movie ReviewsTommy Boy (1995)
Movie RobMonty Python And The Holy Grail (1975)
It Rains… You Get WetShampoo (1975)
Epileptic MoondancerNight Of The Hunter (1955)
Tranquil DreamsLady And The Tramp (1955)
Fast Film ReviewsOne Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest (1975)
Carly Hearts MoviesTommy (1975)
Committed to CelluloidCasino (1995)
Movies SilentlyThe Taking Of Luke McVane (1915)
Cindy BruchmanBarry Lyndon (1975)
Kaput, AlreadyThe Purple Rose Of Cairo (1985)
Back To The ViewerA Night At The Opera (1935)
Film GrimoireDeep Red (1975)
Movie Man JacksonThe Stepford Wives (1975)

On top of these guys, Tom will be reviewing Batman Begins (2005), while I’ll be having a stab at Back To The Future (1985).

We’re looking to run the blogathon from Monday, 18 May. If you’d like to get involved then please drop me an email at threerowsback@gmail.com or email Tom at tomlittle2011@gmail.com letting us know which film you’d like to cover or for more info.

Don’t miss out!

Review – Rebellion

This review originally formed part of my blog covering the 2011 London Film Festival. Only now has the film finally gained a wide international release.

Mathieu Kassovitz's Rebellion - "brave, prescient film-making of the highest order"

Mathieu Kassovitz’s Rebellion – “brave, prescient film-making of the highest order”

Mathieu Kassovitz has never quite managed to reach the same heights as his hard-hitting debut feature La Haine (1995). In fact he was fast turning into a hack for hire with such lightweight US genre fare as the terrible Halle Berry ‘shocker’ Gothika (2003) and Vin Diesel-starring sci-fi dud Babylon AD (2008).

Well, Kassovitz is back in France and back to his best with the searing, heavyweight political thriller Rebellion, which chronicles an incident in 1988 in the French colony of New Caledonia when 27 hostages were taken by a group of indigenous guerilla fighters seeking independence, and the bloody military rescue operation that subsequently took place.

The French forces round up the 'insurgents' in Rebellion

The French forces round up the ‘insurgents’ in Rebellion

Kassovitz films the drama through the eyes and experiences of Philippe Legorjus (played by the director himself), a Captain with the French GIGN counter-terrorist special forces, which were called on to assist the army with tracking down the ‘insurgents’ and freeing the hostages.

Legorjus and his men are primarily trained to deal with hostage-takers through negotiation, but the Captain quickly gets the impression that talking isn’t the number one goal of the military brass and French minister Bernard Pons (Daniel Martin), especially when there’s a presidential election taking place in France and incumbent President François Mitterrand and his opponent Jacques Chirac are trying to out-do each other over their tough stances on the unfolding crisis.

The bloody fallout of the 1988 New Caledonia hostage crisis begins in Rebellion

The bloody fallout of the 1988 New Caledonia hostage crisis begins in Rebellion

Legorjus nevertheless tries to make contact with the group holding the hostages and succeeds after he is himself taken hostage. He wins the hard-earned trust of leader Alphonse Dianou (Iabe Lapacas) and is set free, promising to do what he can to give the group a platform in which to put their case for independence forward.

With the situation still tense, Legorjus works around the clock trying to convince the powers that be that the hostage-takers are willing to negotiate, but keeps running into brick walls until time runs out and a full military assault is ordered. With no time left, Legorjus realises he must betray Dianou’s trust in an effort to save as many of the hostages as he can.

The military brass in full effect in Rebellion

The military brass in full effect in Rebellion

Counting down over the course of 10 days until the dramatic, bloody assault on the cave where the hostages are being held, there’s a growing sense of inevitability that Legorjus is fighting a losing battle.

There are pointed remarks sprinkled throughout the film as to where this path is headed; when Legorjus tells a lawyer living on the island that the order to attack has been given, he asks the captain incredulously “the government wouldn’t do that would they?”. Another moment comes earlier in the film when Legorjus reminds his men that the population of New Caledonia are officially French citizens and therefore not ‘the enemy’. Needless to say these words ring hollow later in the film.

Thought-provoking and provocative, the anger of the film seeps out of every frame. This is brave, prescient film-making of the highest order.