Review – Jason Bourne

As Jason Bourne’s fellow action spy James Bond once said, never say never again as the former CIA assassin emerges from the shadows to deliver his own particular blend of gritty retribution.

Jason Bourne - a hugely enjoyable hurrah for the franchise and a superior action movie in a summer that is sorely in need of one. If it ain't broke, don't fix it, eh?

Jason Bourne – a hugely enjoyable hurrah for the franchise and a superior action movie in a summer that is sorely in need of one. If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it, eh?

The sight of Matt Damon’s amnesiac swimming away to an uncertain, but seemingly triumphant future at the conclusion of 2007’s The Bourne Ultimatum perfectly capped off a trilogy which redefined action cinema.

That was it right? Damon certainly seemed to think so, pointing out in numerous interviews that this chapter in Bourne’s story had reached its natural end. The door was admittedly left ajar (Damon and director Paul Greengrass have been open about how much they love working together), but Ultimatum‘s denouement was the franchise’s perfect top and tail, while its poorer relative The Bourne Legacy suggested the well had been tapped enough.

The sleeping giant awakes in Jason Bourne

The sleeping giant awakes in Jason Bourne

Almost a decade on, however, and Bourne’s back; older, just as tortured and surviving on the fringes of a world that is almost unrecognisable to the one he swam away from years earlier. Whilst Bond gets around this by flipping the reset switch to make way for a new era and a new actor, Bourne’s return is a continuation of where we left off, with his fellow CIA-agent-turned-fugitive Nicky Parsons (Julia Stiles) tracking Bourne down in Greece to tell him that he still has unfinished business and that his former employers are, surprise surprise, up to no good.

Another day, another dodby CIA Director: Tommy Lee Jones plays spook Robert Dewey in Jason Bourne

Another day, another dodgy CIA Director: Tommy Lee Jones plays spook Robert Dewey in Jason Bourne

Bourne just wants to be left alone, but finds he must once again go in search of answers and confront the CIA’s shadiest characters, in particular Director Robert Dewey (Tommy Lee Jones – exhibiting capital ‘C’ craggy features), while up-and-coming Agent Heather Lee (Alicia Vikander) seemingly has somewhat muddy motivations.

In keeping with the overarching thread of the series, previous deeds have continued to echo throughout the Bourne franchise, whether it be the similar way certain ‘assets’ are dispatched from film to film (strangulation), the aftermath of the car chases in Ultimatum and The Bourne Supremacy when he confronts his respective nemesis, or even the scene in Ultimatum when Nicky dyes and cuts her hair which harkens back to Marie having done the same in The Bourne Identity.

Double/triple cross: Alicia Vikander plays CIA agent Heather Lee

Double/triple cross: Alicia Vikander plays CIA agent Heather Lee

In Jason Bourne, these echoes continue to reverberate, from the tragic fate of a character who gets caught in the hunt for Bourne, to the European locations he revisits in his quest for the truth (Berlin, London).

Many have criticised this latest adventure for ultimately leaving Bourne back where he started – a fugitive who must stay off the grid in order to survive. It’s an argument that certainly holds some water, but when it’s executed with as much adrenaline-fuelled effortlessness as it is here then this ‘problem’ feels largely insignificant.

Back together again: Bourne (Matt Damon) and Nicky Parsons (Julia Stiles) in Jason Bourne

Back together again: Bourne (Matt Damon) and Nicky Parsons (Julia Stiles) in Jason Bourne

Did we really need to know any more of Bourne’s past? Probably not; too much information has a way of diluting what makes the character interesting in the first place. However, Greengrass and fellow screenwriter Christopher Rouse, much like in the original trilogy, have managed to deliver a full-throttle action movie that taps in to the societal and political concerns of the day; in this case unrest with austerity and our ongoing unease with the impact on privacy in the rapidly evolving digital world (personified here in a plotline involving Riz Ahmed’s social media magnate Aaron Kalloor).

The extended opening salvo in Athens is masterfully handled, with Bourne and Nicky trying to evade Vincent Cassel’s unrelenting asset whilst the city descends into anarchy in the wake of an anti-austerity demonstration. Likewise, the cat and mouse game played out on the streets of London is reminiscent of the inspired Waterloo Station sequence from Ultimatum.

The asset (Vincent Cassel) goes after our hero in Jason Bourne

The asset (Vincent Cassel) goes after our hero in Jason Bourne

Of course, no Bourne movie would be complete without a car chase and this latest chapter delivers its biggest one yet. Bigger doesn’t always make better, however, as the scene involving a destructive SWAT vehicle ploughing through the neon-lit streets of Las Vegas not only outstays its welcome , but also has an incredulity to it that certainly wasn’t there in the previous films.

It’s a duff note, but one that doesn’t spoil what is a hugely enjoyable hurrah for the franchise and a superior action movie in a summer that is sorely in need of one. If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it, eh?

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14 comments

  1. le0pard13 · August 27, 2016

    Agreed! An entertaining actioner that had Damon and Greengrass back where we like ’em. 🙂

    • Three Rows Back · August 28, 2016

      Absolutely mate. About a hundred times better than 99% of everything else this summer.

  2. Tom · August 28, 2016

    If ain’t broke, don’t fix it indeed! Although I heard this was broken somewhat after Legacy. I do hate it when franchises like these continue but with different stars in the lead. (I understand Jeremy Renner played an altogether different agent but it still seems the same to me.) I feel like this series is two movies too many. Or maybe even five … 😉

    • Three Rows Back · August 28, 2016

      Ouch! Well, I don’t class Legacy as a ‘Bourne’ film if you know what I mean. The Bourne franchise is right in my wheelhouse and this is classy entertainment through and through. It ain’t the best in the series (Supremacy for me), but it sure as hell ain’t the disappointment many have made it out to be.

  3. MovieManJackson · August 28, 2016

    Kind of mediocre imo, but there is some good. Do you think the series should end after this?

    • Three Rows Back · August 30, 2016

      Yeah? Sorry it didn’t hit the spot for you mate. I do think it should end. To be honest I didn’t need this one, but I’m not complaining it’s here!

  4. Daniel Simpson (PG Cooper) · August 28, 2016

    Similar feelings here. I can see where the actual story probably isn’t necessary, but the execution is strong enough that it sort of doesn’t matter.

    • Three Rows Back · August 30, 2016

      Thanks for the feedback Daniel. Glad we’re in agreement!

  5. Chris Evans · August 29, 2016

    On the whole I enjoyed this but I also get some of the criticisms, it does feel like a retread in places. But great to say Damon back in action, I just wish Paul Greengrash had kept the shaky cam/fast cuts during the action to a minimum, the car chase was difficult to watch becasue of it. Look at the car chase in Spectre, exciting and energetic without the need for continuosly and violently shaking the camera!

    • Three Rows Back · August 29, 2016

      It’s funny how much Craig-era Bond owes to Bourne though isn’t it? We could have done without this to be sure, but hell, as it’s here I enjoyed the heck out of it!

  6. Mark Walker · August 30, 2016

    I honestly thought this film was a bad idea but it looks like I might check it out after all.

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