Review – Macbeth

Shakespeare’s Scottish play has had a long association with the big screen spanning more than a century, with some adaptations more tragic than others.

The Scottish play has never have looked so eerily cinematic, but the sound and fury at the savage heart of Kurzel's vision fails to truly lift off the page, denying this Macbeth a place among the truly great screen Shakespeares

The Scottish play has never have looked so eerily cinematic, but the sound and fury at the savage heart of Kurzel’s vision fails to truly lift off the page, denying this Macbeth a place among the truly great screen Shakespeares

Alongside the more traditional imaginings of the Bard’s timeless tale of treachery, misguided ambition and revenge – most notably Orson Welles’ 1948 offering and Roman Polanski’s celebrated 1971 depiction – Macbeth has, like so many of Shakespeare’s plays, also lent itself to more dynamic adaptations, in particular Akira Kurosawa’s masterful Throne Of Blood (1957), which transposes the setting from the Scottish highlands to feudal Japan.

This latest conceptualization, courtesy of Australian director Justin Kurzel, is arguably the most visually arresting Macbeth yet seen on screen.

Michael Fassbender has his 300 moment in Macbeth

Michael Fassbender has his 300 moment in Macbeth

Whilst Mel Gibson’s Braveheart (1995) has been invoked, presumably more for the use of war paint, while the slo-mo combat brings to mind Zack Snyder’s battle-porn 300 (2006), the film that most resembles Macbeth, both in its brutally beautiful visual style and tone is Nicolas Winding Refn’s underseen Valhalla Rising (2009).

Working with Director of Photography Adam Arkapaw again following their collaboration on Snowtown (2011), Kurzel shrouds many of the early scenes in an eerie mist that pours over the unforgiving landscape and symbolises the confusion and madness that takes hold, while later scenes resemble Dante’s Inferno, with a hellish blood-red palette engulfing the characters.

All's well that ends well? Macbeth (Michael Fassbender) and the good lady wife (Marion Cotillard) in Macbeth

All’s well that ends well? Macbeth (Michael Fassbender) and the good lady wife (Marion Cotillard) in Macbeth

This militarised adaptation, all shock and awe, is scored to suitably portentous effect by Kurzel’s brother Jed, with a generous use of drums that sound like distant explosions drawing ever closer.

Whilst there can be no denying Macbeth‘s visual impact, the film’s greatest strength also, inversely, becomes its most pronounced weakness as it comes to dominate everything and takes away from the work being done by Michael Fassbender’s title character and his supporting cast.

Banquo (Paddy Considine) ain't too happy in Macbeth

Banquo (Paddy Considine) ain’t too happy in Macbeth

Fassbender and Kurzel have spoken of their Macbeth as being the victim of post traumatic stress disorder, left hollowed out by the soulless savagery of war and the loss of a child. Instead of playing this in an exaggerated fashion, Fassbender instead internalises his pain; however, this more introspective portrayal of the King of Scotland can get drowned out by everything else going on.

Marion Cotillard makes some interesting choices as Lady Macbeth and the overly ambitious malevolence found in so many other portrayals is stripped back here, but her character’s slide into madness feels rushed and inauthentic and a lack of chemistry with Fassbender means it can be difficult to buy into their relationship.

Sound and fury: Michael Fassbender stars in Macbeth

Sound and fury: Michael Fassbender stars in Macbeth

On a more positive note, Sean Harris strikes the right note as Macduff, while Paddy Considine does a lot with what he’s given as Macbeth’s man-at-arms Banquo.

The Scottish play has never have looked so eerily cinematic, but the sound and fury at the savage heart of Kurzel’s vision fails to truly lift off the page, denying this Macbeth a place among the truly great screen Shakespeares.

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15 comments

  1. Adam (Consumed by Film) · November 13, 2015

    I noticed the Valhalla Rising connection too; both films are wonderfully atmospheric and incredibly eerie, and yet both bear an odd beauty. I found myself totally engrossed by this. Great work mate!

  2. le0pard13 · November 13, 2015

    Looking forward to this, if for nothing but Fassbender’s portrayal of this iconic Shakespearean character. Fine review, Mark.

  3. Tom · November 14, 2015

    Damnit. I need to see this movie. NOW!!!!

    • Three Rows Back · November 19, 2015

      Weeeeeelllll, it’s ok, not amazing. Look forward to your thoughts though.

  4. ruth · November 16, 2015

    WOW you’ve seen this already? Lucky you Mark! Can’t wait to see this! Marion has a lack of chemistry with Fassbender?? Hmmm, well that’s a bummer, but glad to hear overall it’s great though.

    • Three Rows Back · November 19, 2015

      It’s been over here a little while. Temper your expectations a little Ruth, but I hope you enjoy it more than me.

  5. Mark Walker · November 16, 2015

    Shakespeare, Fassbender and Scotland will always peak my interest, man. I really need to get onto this as soon as possible.

    • Three Rows Back · November 19, 2015

      Like I say in the review, temper your expectations, but Fassbender is great and the cinematography is amazing.

  6. Victor De Leon · November 16, 2015

    Sounds good, Mark. Will give this a look, man! Thanks 🙂

    • Three Rows Back · November 19, 2015

      Thanks Vic! It’s well worth a look, especially on the big screen if possible.

  7. Zoë · November 18, 2015

    I really want to see this. Great work.

    • Three Rows Back · November 19, 2015

      Cheers Zoe. Don’t get your hopes up too much, but it’s beautiful to look at.

  8. Jay · November 20, 2015

    Gah! I need to see this.

  9. vinnieh · November 29, 2015

    Awesome review, the cast is what looks most interesting and the visuals too. I’ll have to see it so I can give my opinion on it.

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