Review – Fruitvale Station

There’s something remarkably matter-of-fact about Ryan Coogler’s portrait of the hours leading up to the tragic and needless shooting of Oscar Grant III.

An undeniably powerful and harrowing lament of a life taken far too early it may be, but Fruitvale Station fails to break free of its heavy-handed shackles

An undeniably powerful and harrowing lament of a life taken far too early it may be, but Fruitvale Station fails to break free of its heavy-handed shackles

The drama that unfolds over the course of Fruitvale Station‘s 85 minutes could so easily have been amplified for propagandistic effect, so it’s to the credit of both the writer-director and a mature and measured Michael B. Jordan in the lead role that this is avoided.

However, a heavy-handed script, manipulative visual touches and a televisual style cut the film short of being a truly outstanding debut feature from Coogler.

Oscar (Michael B. Jordan) hangs out with his daughter Tatiana (Ariana Neal) in Fruitvale Station

Oscar (Michael B. Jordan) hangs out with his daughter Tatiana (Ariana Neal) in Fruitvale Station

Fruitvale Station follows the final day of Grant, a young guy from California who spends New Year’s Eve in 2008 trying to make a fresh start.

As well as attempting to work things through with his girlfriend Sophina (Melonie Diaz) for the sake of their daughter Tatiana (Ariana Neal), Oscar is treading a more straight and narrow path with the law and hoping to get his job back while preparing for his mother Wanda’s (Octavia Spencer) birthday.

Oscar's loving mother Wanda  (Octavia Spencer) in Fruitvale Station

Oscar’s loving mother Wanda (Octavia Spencer) in Fruitvale Station

However, in a cruel irony, an act of kindness earlier in the film inadvertently creates a chain of events that lead to Oscar’s death at the eponymous Fruitvale Station when he’s shot in the back by a BART police officer; an act filmed by several passengers on their mobile phones.

The film’s elliptical structure opens with chilling footage taken by one of the passengers before rewinding back to the start of the day and following Oscar until his tragic shooting. The harrowing events at the station are undeniably shocking and are powerfully reenacted by Coogler with the help of Kevin Durand and Chad Michael Murray as the police officers whose actions led to his death (the officer who shot Oscar argued in court that he mistakenly used his firearm, believing it to be his Taser weapon).

Sophina (Melonie Diaz) faces an awkward moment with boyfriend Oscar (Michael B. Jordan) in Fruitvale Station

Sophina (Melonie Diaz) faces an awkward moment with boyfriend Oscar (Michael B. Jordan) in Fruitvale Station

There’s a sadness to the scenes leading up to this moment as we know Oscar is going to be denied the fruits of his labours. However, Coogler lets himself down by forcing the issue too much.

The death of a dog right in front of Oscar is a little too on the money and isn’t helped by the director pulling the shot back to show a train leaving a station as a prophetic sign of what’s to come.

Officer Caruso (Kevin Durand) imposes himself on Oscar (Michael B. Jordan) and his friends in Fruitvale Station

Officer Caruso (Kevin Durand) imposes himself on Oscar (Michael B. Jordan) and his friends in Fruitvale Station

Later in the film, Oscar suggests to Sophina that they should stay in, but she insists on going out to enjoy New Year’s Eve. Likewise, his daughter implores Oscar not to go out because she can hear “gunshots” (actually firecrackers), but he promises her there’s nothing to worry about.

This lack of subtly extends to some of the visual choices made by the director. A slo-mo scene of Oscar running after Tatiana feels manipulative and the cheesy score laid on top merely reinforces this. A further life decision that sees Oscar driving to the coast and staring out to sea is beautifully filmed, but serves no other purpose than to hammer home a point we’ve already ascertained.

Michael B. Jordan plays Oscar Grant III in Fruitvale Station

Michael B. Jordan plays Oscar Grant III in Fruitvale Station

In spite of this, the performances are universally compelling, with Spencer on devastating form as Oscar’s mother, whose hopes of a better life for her son following a stint in jail are cruelly snatched away. Diaz is also excellent as the headstrong Sophina, while Neal is a natural who’s required to do as much heavy lifting as many of her older co-stars.

However, this is Jordan’s film and he gives a magnetic turn as Oscar. Jordan is careful not to paint his character as a saint, rather’s he’s a good man who’s smart enough to understand the path he needs to take is different to the one he’s found himself down.

An undeniably powerful and harrowing lament of a life taken far too early it may be, but Fruitvale Station fails to break free of its heavy-handed shackles.

Advertisements

18 comments

  1. don’t know if I can handle the death of a dog – I’m such a wuss. this has been in the pile for awhile, and I keep meaning to catch up with it

  2. Brian H (Movies After Dark) · June 11, 2014

    It’s a real shame Michael B. Jordan wasn’t up for any major awards. Great review.

    • Three Rows Back · June 12, 2014

      Cheers pal. He deserved more awards recognition, but he’s making a name for himself so it’s good things are working out for him.

  3. Mark Walker · June 11, 2014

    I found slight flaws here and there, Mark (particularly the dog scene) but other than that I took plenty from this. I thought it was quite a solidly made flick and Jordan was outstanding in the lead.

    • Three Rows Back · June 12, 2014

      I remember your review Mark. I took plenty too, but it had the hallmarks of a first time director at times.

  4. ruth · June 11, 2014

    I’m curious to see what all the fuss is about this film, but even though the story itself is heartbreaking, the film itself didn’t seem all that intriguing to me. Maybe I’ll catch up w/ it one day though.

    • Three Rows Back · June 12, 2014

      I think you’d like this Ruth. It’ll be on Netflix/rental pretty soon; it’s worth it.

  5. Wendell · June 12, 2014

    I have to agree with Mark. I found small flaws, but thought it was great overall. It’s actually one of my favorites from last year. Jordan was flat out phenomenal. Glad you checked it out, though.

    • Three Rows Back · June 12, 2014

      Yeah, pretty much on the same page with yoo. Wouldn’t put it in my top 10 of the year, but it’s a very solid watch.

  6. Victor De Leon · June 12, 2014

    Good review! I cant seem to muster up the resolve to watch this movie for some reason. I have a copy but it is buried under other films. It just seems likes such a downer. I think I will try to suck it up and watch it per your review. Thanks and good work like always!

    • Three Rows Back · June 12, 2014

      Well, I’m glad to have that effect! Do watch it mate, I think you’ll like it.

  7. Tom · June 14, 2014

    I think it’s the whole heavy-handed portrayal and excessive foreshadowing that’s kept me from checking this out. It’s all but a foregone conclusion what happens to this poor fellow. And while it’s great news to hear Jordan’s acting is superb, I don’t think it’ll be enough to sway my decision to see it. Now if this film were truly excellent and lacked some of these flaws you mentioned, I think I’d be willing to rent it. As of right now though, I think I’ll skip by it. Cooger’s probably going to make some better stuff if this is his first film!!!

    Great review buddy.

    • Three Rows Back · June 16, 2014

      Fair dues. There are way too many movies out there to see right?! This is very much a debut feature by an obviously talented guy. He’s got a bright future I think.

  8. CinemaClown · June 26, 2014

    Good review, dude. 2013 was a very strong year for movies n this one was an unexpected surprise. A little exaggerated but still it was a touching tale.

    • Three Rows Back · June 26, 2014

      Thank you! It was a good year wasn’t it? It had the hallmarks of a debut feature but there’s a lot of promise there.

      • CinemaClown · June 26, 2014

        It at least makes sure that we all will be looking for what the director does next. He looks promising enough.

Comment

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s